What You Should Know About Working as a Civil Engineer

Civil Engineer

As one of the oldest engineering professions, civil engineering continues to be an important field in today’s society. These practitioners are key in creating and developing the built environment. From roads to bridges to water conveyance systems and more, these engineers play a major role in life as we know it. Are you considering studying this field in school? Here’s what you should know about working as a civil engineer.

How Much School?

Unlike law school or med school, engineers aren’t necessarily required to do graduate work to find good jobs; however in certain markets, you might need a Master’s degree to be competitive. Look for a civil engineering program that is accredited by ABET or the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology. Graduate work in this field gives you opportunities to deepen your education in one of the many practice areas in the field such as transportation, structural, geotechnical, environmental, water resources, construction management and more.

Where To Work?

Civil engineering graduates can find careers in various disciplines in both the public and private sectors. Many people start off doing designand eventually move into project management. They can work for state departments of transportation, private design firms or even construction companies MA. Some engineers pursue a career in academia for teaching and research. As an engineer, you develop skills in logic, analysis and problem solving that lead to careers outside of the field such as law, medicine and business.

Do I Need a License?

As a civil engineer, you may need to earn your professional engineering license. In most states, you’re required to pass a fundamentals exam that certifies you as an engineer-in-training. With four years of experience and successful completion of a licensing exam, you can become a professional engineer. These engineers can sign and seal designs for public facilities and run their own firms. Your particular career path may not require licensure.

You have many options as a new graduate in this field. You can design new facilities, oversee their construction and maintenance or conduct relevant research. The options are endless.…

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Is a Career in CNC Machining Right for You?

CNC Machining

If you are detail-oriented, like numbers and enjoy working with technology, the area of Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) machining may be a good career choice. This field is crucial to manufacturing, so the job outlook looks very good in the coming years.

Why Is CNC Machining Important?

CNC machines are involved in all types of manufacturing. They are used to make everything from automobile parts to medical equipment and are an integral part of 21st century industry. CNC machining can make precise cuts, grinds and holes for applications that require extreme precision.

What Do CNC Operators Do?

People who run CNC machines are usually responsible for making sure the equipment is in good order, setting it up, programming it and producing the finished part. In large companies, those tasks could be shared over several employees, but in a small shop, one person might do the whole thing.

What Education Do You Need?

CNC Operators usually go to a trade school. A high school diploma or GED is required by most employers, and many will hire people who attended a vocational-technical or career center for CNC machining in high school. Some institutions offer associate degrees in CNC machining, and there are three levels of certification available through the National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS). These programs look at programming and using CNC equipment and skill in machining in general. After the initial training, many operators work as apprentices for a few years before becoming fully certified.

What Does a CNC Operator Make?

The Bureau of Labor Statistics lists the median salary for CNC operators at $45,000 a year. Salaries can depend upon where you live, so consider that figure an estimate. The good thing, though, is that there are jobs for CNC operators everywhere and the job outlook is good for the future.

The demand for CNC operators is high and expected to remain that way. This can be an interesting career for people who enjoy math, machines and technology.…

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Tips for Relocating Your Company Efficiently

relocate your company

If moving is stressful, moving an entire company is anxiety inducing. You have to be concerned about lost productivity, damaging equipment and either moving or hiring new employees. These are a few tips in case you plan to relocate your company.

Create a Plan

Your first task should be creating a plan for the move. First, analyze the layout of your current office. What works, and what doesn’t? During the move, you can plan your new office for utmost productivity and comfort. You should also determine your budget. Identify a schedule for your internet and phone updates, as well as changes in insurance, licenses, utilities and other services.

Deal With Your Equipment

If you don’t plan on purchasing new equipment, moving your old equipment will take special care. Not only do you want to avoid breaking any of the pieces, but you also don’t want your equipment jostled too much to change its calibration or move its parts, which can cause severe damage when it is set back up and running again. You also don’t want it to be damaged to the extent that it does not work at all when you are all moved in. In addition, you need to move it efficiently so that you don’t lose much if any productivity. Therefore, you may consider working with a relocation specialist Los Angeles. These companies pack, load, haul and unload your machinery in its new home, but you will need to arrange things a few months in advance.

Pursue Open Communication

Inform your employees at least 4-6 months prior to your relocation, so they are prepared for the upheaval to come. Your vendors and customers should also be notified within a few months of the move. You will also need to update your website and other marketing materials, including your letterhead and business cards, a few weeks before the move.

A well-planned move can help you reduce productivity loss and set up your new office with less stress and greater efficiency. Create a checklist and schedule to expedite your relocation process.…

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